Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Slowing Down

It's mid-semester. We're all a little tired, cold, and overworked. Today, as I race against yet another dissertation deadline and feverishly inscribe as many mid-semester tasks as possible into my dayplanner, I want to take a moment and remind us all to......:

SLOW DOWN. 
Here's some Rothko for ya. Click on the image. It'll help.

I used to be such a daydreamer, and those moments of thinking and reflecting and just sitting on the couch, staring into space, or going for long walks in the neighborhood, allowed my mind to wander and explore in a way that is becoming increasingly unavailable now that I'm constantly scrolling through my iPhone, oh that accursed piece of wondrous technology.

The Bored and Brilliant project begun by New Tech City has been asking listeners to think hard about our relationship to our devices, now that 58% of American adults own a smartphone. Our smartphones make us connected and entertained, NTC observes, but also dependent and addicted. (I write this as someone who has, on multiple occasions, worried that probably this person is really very angry with me--or, worse, annoyed or indifferent--because he/she has not responded to my text from three hours ago. AND I SAW THE BUBBLES.) At the risk of sounding like a crotchety luddite, I'd suggest that in this digital world, we are losing the capability of being idle; and "idle minds lead to reflective, creative thoughts," according to this project and the research behind it. How often, during a spare moment, do you fill your mental space by grabbing your phone and scrolling through Facebook or Twitter? When was the last time you let your mind wander? When was the last time you got lost in a work of art, or just freewrote for a few minutes--about anything? Or just sat with your eyes closed, headphones in? (Spotify has some great mood playlists; I'm partial to "Deep Focus").

I want to emphasize that I'm not advocating for slowing down primarily because it will, ultimately, increase your productivity when you speed up again. Such mentality feeds into a neoliberal need to produce, and to serve the all-consuming academic system to which we are hopelessly bound. You should slow down for you, because you are awesome and have cool, creative, independent thoughts that don't always need to overlap with academia or the primary work you do. Because "academic" is not the sum-total of your identity. Because this is not about productivity, this is about self-care.

Related to the power of boredom is the "power of patience" (article of the same title here), and decelerating can constitute part of our classroom practices as well. Harvard art historian Jennifer L. Roberts believes that educators should "take a more active role in shaping the temporal experiences" of students, learning to guide practices of "deceleration, patience, and immersive attention."* Exercises that require students to slow down, to meditate on the material at-hand and allow it to open up to them in its singularity, counter that which in the eyes of some critics has become a modern impulse toward distraction, shallow reflection, and superficial thinking. Roberts in particular requires her students to position themselves in a museum and gaze at a work of art for a veeery long period of time (though I have to say that three hours seems a little excessive...), reflecting on their experience afterwards. Colleagues of mine have had success with this exercise, and I look forward to trying it with my students in March. Do you have any other thoughts on how to guide the temporal experiences of our students, and encourage them to practice creative idleness?

So, feminist friends, let this be a reminder to you to slow down today, even just for 10 minutes. And the night-owl in me is going to practice what I'm preaching right this moment and head to bed.

*For this article, as well as the "slow looking" exercise that accompanies it, I am thoroughly indebted to Julie Orlemanski; thanks, Julie, for a particularly generative--and generous--Facebook post!


2 comments:

  1. I have a problem with my eyes that requires me to put a warm compress on them 4 or 5 times a day. When the doctor told me this, I was annoyed, but then I realized how nice it is! At first, I feel like some hysterical 18th century lady who is being given a calming draught. But then I just felt relaxed, lying back, thinking my thoughts. I would highly recommend it, even if your eyes are healthy (though 5 times a day is excessive!).

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    Replies
    1. That sounds like an unexpected blessing, Kaarina! Though I hope your eye problem improves.

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