Tuesday, March 17, 2015

When you just don't want to write

It's mid-March. The days are longer, warmed by sun, but frost lingers in the morning, and piles of snow creep into the shadows, refusing to melt. The semester is furiously racing to its end, our energy reserves are depleting, and while we can see the close of the term, we're all wondering if we're going to end before it does.

I've been working on a substantially revising a long section of my dissertation, but on some days my brain is foggy, or I feel a lack of confidence, afraid I don't know what I'm doing. As the term winds to a close and writing deadlines approach, I've found a few tried and true methods for getting the work of writing done, even if it feels near impossible.

1. The Pomodoro Method: We've talked about this a lot on Hook and Eye before, but the Pomodoro technique really does help to give focus to a writing task. If I'm stuck in the endless chasm of research and can't seem to get my way out of it, I turn off the internet, set the timer for 25 minutes, and then dedicate my full attention to the task of writing. It's really helpful when I'm not feeling motivated because 25 minutes is such a manageable length of time: anyone can do it. After the timer rings, if I'm really vigilant, I'll only take a 5 minute break, which I also use the timer to structure. After four cycles, I give myself a 15 minute break.

2. Take Real Breaks: Boyda talked a couple weeks ago about slowing down and unplugging, and I highly recommend it. Even if you can only take a 3-5 minute break, don't spend it surfing the internet, or checking your phone, or staring at some kind of a screen. If you can, stand up, move around, stretch, or just close your computer and stare out a window or into space. It's enormously beneficial to do something different so the break feels like a real break and not just the same old.

3. Get Moving: If you have a bit more time, go for a walk with a friend. Get outside for the fresh air and vitamin D, or just go get coffee. Even if you don't drink coffee, just go for the walk. If you can't spare the time, spend five minutes doing jumping jacks or running in place, or have a personal dance party. If you only have a few seconds, my three-year-old would probably recommend the Crazy Shake.

4. Make Lists: At the beginning of each day, make yourself a to-do list of what you need to accomplish, and decide what to prioritize for that day. On Mondays, it can be really beneficial to write down your goals for the week, and then break it down into daily chunks. It can also be useful to work back from any impending deadlines in order to help structure your time on a month-or-semester-long basis. Sometimes these goals aren't met in the way we think we will meet them, but having them in the first place means they can be revisited or that we can make new priorities when the unexpected occurs.

5. Meet up with Friends: One of the most important things for me personally is having people around me to keep me accountable to my writing goals. Whether I meet up with them in person, like for my weekly writing club where we do community pomodoros (if you're at the U of A, join us!), or to an online googledocs spreadsheet to write out my weekly and daily goals, when someone else knows what I commit to, it becomes much easier to do it. The extra accountability means I'm far more likely to get stuff done. Also, it's harder to putz around on the internet when someone is hovering over your shoulder.

6. Just do it: Even if your brain doesn't want to cooperate, just force yourself to focus. Turn off the internet, gather every spec of willpower, and focus on the writing task at hand. Sometimes just writing the first couple of words on the blank page can be the key to gaining momentum.


2 comments:

  1. I also find it helpful to list everything I accomplish each day, so I can see my progress in terms besides word counts. It's important for me to recognize how far I've come, not just how much farther I have to go.

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  2. This is very good advice. Sometimes I do handstands in my office for a break, because turning myself upside is cognitively and physically demanding, but totally different from typing. Also, do not underestimate the power of a 15-20 nap in the afternoon. It is incredibly refreshing.

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