Monday, November 23, 2015

Surthrival

Late last week I was chatting with a friend of mine and we asked one another, "how are you?" And then we both giggled. Okay, actually we sent one another ellipses and exclamation points, because we were chatting on Facebook. The hilarity and lack of verbal articulation came from the fact that my friend, who is a single parent, is teaching four classes this term, and I, a co-parent to a six month old, am teaching two classes while my partner teaches three. We have no child care. My friend was up grading papers after teaching three classes, running tutorials, and making sure her own kids were well and fed and getting what they needed. I was awake working on a job application after having driven with my partner two-thirds of the way to New England for a conference at which he was to give a paper the next day. My partner was working on a paper after having taught a class and driving for six hours. Our kiddo, generous being that she is, was asleep in her portable crib in the middle of the hotel room.

How are you?

...!!!???!!!...

Our wordless pause came from this, then: we are both in it up to our eyeballs, my friend and I. We are running from the moment we wake to the moment we drop into bed. We are, neither of us, in stable work, so there's the usual scramble to keep it all afloat. And yet. And yet as my friend and I agreed, the things that keep us grounded--the mornings, when my girl wakes us up singing in her tiny infant voice, the afternoons when my friend steals a moment to write--these things are good. There are roots in our lives, we agreed.

But let's not deny it is hard. Let us not deny the feeling of being eaten alive by bureaucracy, Brazil-like. Let's not ignore the data that suggests that nearly half the people working in higher education exhibit symptoms of psychological distress.

I want a word that means more than "surviving" without losing that hard-scrabble fact of what is really going on. I want a word that defies the isolation that comes with working in the academy, because my work--the job I go and do--can and does bring me joy, even if the conditions of that work cannot. I want a word that acknowledges the emotional labour, the sheer physical labour (you should see how quick I am on my bicycle, zipping to campus and class as soon as my partner gets home from his class to take bébé).

"I hope survival turns to thrival," I wrote to my friend, in an attempt to name our own daily work of making our lives good despite, or in spite, or just in the midst of the long, hard work.

"Here's to surTHRIVEal!" she wrote back, proving once again (let us acknowledge it here) that poets are indeed the legislators of the world.

So here's to surthriving. To the precariate, doing your jobs and keeping your head and your spirits above water: surthrive. Find what lifts you. To the graduate students, filled with fear and anxiety about what is next and what is now: surthrive. You are smart. To the assistant professors, finishing their first terms and finding that the dream is still a f*ckload of work: surthrive. You deserve your job, we need you there. To the associate professors, keeping it all going despite the oft-unacknowledged workload: surthrive. You are in positions of power, don't forget that. To the full professors, wondering, perhaps, what happened to the university you came to at the beginning of your career: surthrive. We need you. To the undergraduate students, facing student debt, facing final exams, trying to keep a social life and likely a job, too: surthrive. Find what lifts you up and hold onto that shining thing and let it light your way. To the administrative staff, keeping us all organized, and keepers of our quiet and not-so-quiet sorrows: surthrive. You keep this whole boat level and moving forward with the band playing.

Here is to surthrival. Here is to refusing to lose the light while acknowledging that the darkness is coming earlier these days. Here is to remembering that there are good moments in each day if we look for them. And here is to refuelling our resolve to make more of the day good, generative, and generous.

4 comments:

  1. This term is so apt and so needed in my life, thank you!

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    1. It was a collaborative effort! So glad it resonates for you!

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  2. http://www.danielvitalis.com/surthrival-creed/

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  3. I appreciate this... if I'm being totally honest, I appreciate it because it just confirms for me that an academic job is not something I want. I don't want to feel that burned and exhausted, or to try to balance a career that challenging with kids. Thanks for being honest about what it's like! (And also, high five for making it work for you :) No shade on the lifestyle, just a "good for you, not for me thing" - credit to Our Lady Amy Poehler for that phrase!

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