Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Surviving the Job Market

I've been a bad blogger recently. I've missed a Tuesday or two, and I'm generally the blogger posting to our Facebook page but I've been inconsistent with that, too. Thankfully for my inadequacies, my cobloggers are patient and forgiving, and H&E has been blessed with a rich assortment of guest posts lately, from dealing with the death of one's mother as a professor to formulating a "critical theory of breast cancer" to communing with the spirits of one's literary mothers. I'm grateful for the women who volunteer to share their stories in the public space of the internet, still and always a risky and scary venture. From my outpost in the land of guns and Trumps and confederate flags, I continue to value this warm, badass, brilliant academic community based in the land that has been so formative for my identity (the Canadian jokes amongst friends persist, even after over five years of American residency). We've been talking a lot lately about making visible the many tacit modes of emotional labour that underpin our responsibilities as professionals, and in some ways this entire blog is an exercise in emotional labour, a means of bringing to the surface the injustices, the frustrations, the inspirations, the fraught sartorial choices that constitute and define our lives as academics.

This year, I'm on the job market for the first time (not deluding myself into thinking it will be the last). In some ways I am coping better than expected, and in other ways I'm coping worse--I find myself avoiding campus and shunning society a little bit more than I'm comfortable admitting, because it's sometimes hard to face questions from academic peers regarding how the whole process is going. I am paranoid about almost everything I put on the Internet dot com (as my friend calls it): will my academia.edu or Chronicle Vitae profiles prove liabilities if I don't ensure they're constantly updated and consistent across all my other application materials? If I tweet something silly or overly personal, will that happen at the same moment a job committee is checking out my "professional" Twitter account? Will this post jeopardize me in some way, somehow?

In spite of these fears, I thought I'd open up a conversation about how I'm surviving this harrowing season, and I would love other seeds of advice in the comments. How are you surviving the job market, dear readers? Let's fight against the tendency to be competitive and silent and paranoid about the process, and help each other through the process, to the limited extent that we can.

Here's how I've been surviving: 

1. Seeking advice from those who have gone through the process. Perhaps an obvious point, but your department should have resources for this. My department's Job Market Handbook has been an indispensable resource that breaks down each of the steps and materials involved in the application process. If your department doesn't have something like this, as well as a professor charged with going through your materials, shoot someone an email asking why not! In the meantime, this roundup of advice from JM survivors which was posted on the medieval blog In the Middle a couple years ago is still immensely relevant and useful. Most of you probably know about the resources and columns provided by The Professor is In, and Vitae (part of The Chronicle of Higher Education but specifically geared toward emerging academics), publishes a number of useful advice columns every week, such as this with general advice, this on whether one should mention babies in app letters, and this on navigating the #alt-ac path. There's a lot out there, and I don't pay attention to all of it, and I don't agree with all of it, and some of it I actively shun. Just as important as seeking advice from those who have weathered the process, of course, is knowing when not to expose oneself to the resources available, because they can prove overwhelming, inconsistent, and/or disheartening.

2. Fighting against the temptation not to talk about it. Something as consequential as going on the academic job market after 7+ years of graduate education is difficult, in many ways, to talk about. It's difficult because it's so personal, because the journey is fraught with disappointments, because conversations with other academics in similar situations can sometimes feel inherently competitive, as though you're both constantly comparing each other's suitability. This is not always the case, and while it's important to identify people whose attitudes make you feel small or under constant scrutiny, it is also important to trust that most of us genuinely want others to succeed, too. I treasure the commiserative conversations I have with my comrades who are also facing the deep dark chasm of the market, and have found that opening up and chatting about frustrations along the way, even when we're applying for the same jobs ("did you see that one guy's faculty profile?? What was up with that poorly worded application?") can prove therapeutic.

3. Fighting against the temptation to talk about it all the time. Yeahhhh, you also don't want to be that person. That person who is so subsumed in the process that he/she can't talk/tweet/status about anything else, and is constantly steamrolling conversations with the minutia of application problems (which are legion). There are going to be frustrations and sometimes the best strategy is to just laugh at them silently, or slap a good ol' ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ onto the situation. Because the process is ridiculous, and often dehumanizing, and most of this is out of your control.

4. Learning to compartmentalize: I work out demanding but mostly realistic plans for each day, and I've discovered that committing myself to those goals means that I do not always have to respond to an email or message the second it arrives on my phone or in my inbox. This is a problem that we didn't face as seriously 10 or 15 years ago: now that we can, with the touch of a few buttons on our smartphones, effectively insert ourselves into the cognitive space of anyone we want at any given moment, we as a society seem to have acquired new purchase over other people's availability. And as women, we have the tendency to accommodate, to set aside our immediate problems and offer assistance to those who reach out to us. This is true on a personal level, but also a professional level: as Myra Green describes in a Chronicle article, female professors are approached more often than male professors for "confidential" conversations that largely deal with personal and emotional problems. Against my accommodating, social, and nurturing nature, I've been practicing prioritizing my own work and problems sometimes by saying "I'm dealing with a few issues at the moment, can I get back to you later?" (and then being sure to follow up later, of course). Schedule time to be with others, and cultivate relationships, but don't feel you need to be available to other people all the time.

5. Learning not to compartmentalize my time (ok, now I might just be aiming for rhetorical effect with these list titles).  I have a handful of friends upon whom I rely quite heavily for emotional support, sometimes on a rather continual, running basis throughout the day through group iMessage threads. I like to think of these covert channels of communication as what Aimee has called "whisper networks," characterized by sometimes gossipy, almost carnivalesque repartee combined with honestspeak regarding the difficulties we face on a quotidian basis. Having these outlets reminds me, further to #3 above, not to become wholly consumed in my own problems (even as they also offer me a safe space to express them). I recognize that this point pertains mostly to my own experience and might not be available to everyone, and this may just be a fancy academic way to characterize Having Friends and Being Able to Talk to Them. But I do think digital technology has allowed us to generate multiple, expanded networks of communication and commiseration, and perhaps if you're feeling alone in your plight for whatever reason, you can touch base with a few friendly faces on Twitter who might be going through similar things. Twitter is great for this! 

6. Practicing the art of self-dating. Or, er, thinking about doing this more intentionally, to be more accurate. So far going on self-dates, for me, has been as simple as going for a solo walk along the river on a crisp autumn day, or "staying in tonight" and watching Difficult People on Hulu (sorry, Canada). I have aspirations to take a real self-date soon: going to a movie or the theatre by myself, or going vintage shopping. Dating oneself, rather than relying on others to fill out your schedule and your overall sense of self, can be a powerful notion.

7. Observing the whole process with compassion. I keep telling myself, "I am doing what I can in this present moment and in my present state as a scholar," and sometimes that means, for instance, accidentally submitting the wrong version of a dissertation abstract that includes language duplicated across my application letter. As my veritable saint of a job placement professor, Vlasta Vranjes, expressed to me in a recent email, "it's impossible not to fall into the trap of thinking that any little mistake will cost one a job--or, conversely, that one will get a job if one does everything perfectly." On this point I will return to Amanda Walling's comments in the In the Middle advice-post I linked to earlier: "It is not a meritocracy, or a referendum on your work as a scholar, and 'fit' is not code for that. It's a bunch of flawed people making compromises with each other and with their administrators, and sometimes where you fit into that is just blind luck."

I hope it helps to hear some of these things said out loud, and I welcome further comments, commiserative anecdotes, or advice.

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