Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Structure for Structureless Schedules

As many of you know, grad school can be frustratingly amorphous. Contra most of my cobloggers, it seems, my schedule isn't jam-packed, and I have few daily structural commitments--though many responsibilities, some of them paralyzingly huge. While some people thrive without a pre-ordained schedule, I'm someone who needs it: I dwell more comfortably within the parameters of appointments, responsibilities, deadlines, and course slots. So as we enter into a new year and a new term, I thought I'd share a few tips I've developed for a) carving out my own structure; b) allowing myself some flexibility and compassion within this structure; and c) caring for myself as a human being who requires community and a life outside academia.
1. Maintaining a dissertation completion schedule: years ago, my supervisor made me create a schedule for writing my entire dissertation. From its home in GoogleDocs, that document has been repeatedly revised and updated, but since the diss is the most gargantuan yet nebulous component of the entire graduate experience, it's nice to have a skeleton framework for the whole--and a reminder that it someday will end. 
2. Keeping a daily research journal: "Daily" is a bit of an exaggeration, let's be honest, but when I do keep up with sketching out my accomplishments, however big or small, at the end of each day, it makes me feel like I'm moving forward. I prefer a physical journal, because it allows flexibility for doodling, noting down useful references, or writing out a research phrase that I want to keep at the forefront of my mind as I work. Or, er, screaming silently at myself. 
You could also choose to keep a running list of accomplishments and breaks throughout the day, as featured in this inspiring IG by @empathywarrior:
3. Keeping an agenda: Again, I like keeping a physical one, because I enjoy any chance not to look at a screen, but here I write down appointments, deadlines, and sketch out broad weekly goals. Week-at-a-glance type stuff.  
4. Creating an online boot camp:  Over the summer, I coordinated a collaborative online "Dissertation Boot Camp," based on the Spring Break Dissertation Boot Camp my colleague Christy Pottroff blogged about here. We opted for a shared Google Doc, and the idea was to set macro-goals for the summer and the week and micro-goals for the day, posting and celebrating our accomplishments as we went along. The instructions recommended maintaining constant communication, and acting as cheerleaders for one another, developing healthy online accountability. While I found the exercise valuable overall, I'd have to say that it perhaps worked better as a Spring Break rather than an Entire Summer thing: out of nine of us, by end of August only....a few were still actively posting, and the document also became very long and unwieldy, extending to over 50 pages, making it difficult for us to keep up with one another's progress. But I'm sure improvements in format/medium could be made, and I would certainly try this again.  
5. Creating an online hangout camp: Branching off of Boot Camp, fellow H&E-er Jana and I now use Wikispaces to keep an online goal-setter, where we update each other on a weekly or biweekly basis on intentions and progress. We have a longstanding rapport, so we can be perfectly comfortable with each other; generally, we tend to mix personal and professional, blabbing about our personal lives and venting about other challenges we're facing even as we're trying to crank out that chapter draft. 
Other possibilities for this point include: forming small Twitter groups who check in with each other spontaneously to see who is around and up for working for short sprints, Pomodoro-style (I was part of one such group for awhile, I think we sort of dissolved...); creating a secret or invite-only group Facebook page for people who want to track each other's progress (ditto the last parentheses...). 
5. Finally, I highly recommend the good ol' fashioned personal diary. Not as explicitly about goal-setting, I guess, but one of my major problems is distraction: I'm reading a book on Peter of Cornwall, but thinking about a particularly upsetting episode of Transparent, or a disagreement I had earlier with my friend. My diary helps me compartmentalize (much as I enjoy the intermixing of work/life stuff, as above), and to channel some of my daily interpersonal drama into a safe, private, nonjudgmental space. Occasionally work stuff creeps into my journal, of course, such as goals or reflections, but its primary purpose is the nonacademic, the things I can't voice in my many other outlets of professional expression. Additionally, I think keeping a diary has helped me become a more fluid, expressive writer.
As you can tell, I'm a little goal-obsessed oriented. If I go through periods when I'm not listing, that probably corresponds with reduced mental health: I'm feeling unmoored and directionless, perhaps having trouble getting out of bed in the morning.

And how about you, dear readers? Any further tips you have for setting and maintaining goals?

Aaaand now I can go record in my research journal that I finished drafting up some thoughts and ideas for my next Hook & Eye post, five days early!

Keepers of private notebooks are a different breed altogether, lonely and resistant rearrangers of things, anxious malcontents, children afflicted apparently at birth with some presentiment of loss.
-from Joan Didion, "On Keeping a Notebook"


  1. Love this. My go-to when dissertating was setting up writing dates with any and everyone who was willing (and whom I could trust to focus). Having a set meeting time and another human being involved made me actually WRITE.

    1. Yes, I am very dependent on such intellectual communities, even if we're all just silently sitting next to each other!


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