Monday, September 19, 2016

Hot Topic: How to Amplify Women's Voices in the Academy

Last week a short article was making the rounds on social media. The article was about how women in the Obama administration managed to make their voices heard. The interviewees in the article noted that initially it was difficult to even get into the important meetings. And, when they did get into the meetings they were often overlooked. Or their ideas were not heard and credited as theirs.

Peggy accurately captures my feelings.

So they made a plan.

The women got together (hello, shine theory!) and decided that each time a woman made a suggestion in a meeting other women would repeat her suggestion while naming her and giving credit.

There they were: women boosting other women's ideas and demonstrating how to give credit where credit is due. Think of it as amplification.

I love this idea, and since I read the article I have been thinking about how to bring this more deliberately into my practice in scholarly writing. So here is the beginning of a list of ways to amplify  work by women and other marginalized people:

Citations
I often make an effort to write two lines of argumentation into one paper. Rather than being confusing (two thesis statements?!) this is fun and political. Here's what I mean: I regularly make an effort to cite friends, peers, colleagues, and mentors in my paper if their thinking is relevant to the work I am doing. I've done this since I was a graduate student, and I learned the practice from some of my mentors who thanks me and other students in the acknowledgements of their books. Now, I go out of my way to reference the intellectual work of women when I speak publicly and write. It's my academic version of Le Tigre's anthem Hot Topic.

Invitations
If you're on advisory committees or in department meetings or have any opportunity to influence who gets brought to your campus then speak up! Bring in women. Bring in women of colour. Bring in Indigenous women. Bring in differently abled women. Bring in trans people. In fact, bring them into your classroom! Skype and google hangout are free. Departments often have some sort of funds for guest lecturers. Getting invited to speak, getting paid for your public thinking, and getting your work introduced to a new group of people is invaluable. So speak up and suggest names when you have the opportunity to do so!

Book Reviews
In one of my other writing lives I chair the board of Canadian Women in the Literary Arts aka CWILA. Every year we do a gender audit of book review culture in Canada and one of the things we've found that doesn't show up in the metrics (yet) is that reviews matter in terms of how books and ideas circulate. You know: buzz. It is a real thing. And here is something I have found, though again anecdotally: there's not as much buzz around academic writing by women and other Others. So pitch book reviews! And feel good about the crucial contribution you're making to a richer, more diverse and representative discourse of writing happening in academic circles. Hype books you're excited about (I for one cannot wait for Professor Karina Vernon's book to come out, for example). And speaking of hype...

Referrals
When you're in a conference Q&A or sitting in the department lunchroom talking to colleagues or speaking with graduate students and the inevitable "do you have a text to recommend?" question comes up... recommend with relish and enthusiasm and care! Reference diverse work in your lectures! In your conversations! And...in order to do this, challenge yourself to keep a current sense of new and archival work by to draw on. When's the last time you had Mary Ann Shadd on your early Canadian Literature syllabus, for example? Or what about Tanya Lukin Linklater's work on your Performance Studies syllabus? Referencing and referring feels awesome and it is awesome.

2 comments:

  1. Being a woman scientist required professional academic writing to summarize all the data you collected

    ReplyDelete
  2. yes and the big one for me: cite cite cite. cite your female colleagues and notice that you didn't cite them even though they are doing work that you respect or in your area. notice that you didn't notice them when it came time for citation. add them in manually before you go to print if you realize you forgot to cite them. i reviewed a book on a topic that is directly in my research area in which multiple male colleagues were writing on things i have published on that they know and have heard me speak on and was not cited in it once - because women who write are just not as 'expert' as men so you just 'forget' to cite them. this happens all the time and has to be corrected intentionally.

    that and making introductions with praise for the female colleague's work. those are two key, key moves.

    thanks for this piece, it's great!

    ReplyDelete

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