Thursday, December 15, 2016

Planning for the Holidays, Holidays for Planning


I'm seven working days away from my first vacation in a year and a half. All of my time off from work in 2016 was used to go to the MLA, teach at DHSI, and finish and defend my dissertation. All good things, but none of them a vacation. And I'm tired. Bring on the holidays.

But I'm also mad and scared and sad. I'm not terribly good at being mad and scared and sad. I grew up in a family with only two emotional temperatures--everything is great, or nuclear. I love my family dearly, but being raised by them has left me with, as Hermione Granger would say,  the emotional range of a teaspoon when it comes to the less cheery feelings. And so my natural tendency is to shy away from strong negative feelings because my body and mind don't quite know how to distinguish between "kinda, and justifiably, angry" and the nuclear option of my childhood and adolescence. But I'm learning. (Guts' new "In the Cards: Ask a Feelings-Witch" column was super on point this week--subject: anger--and super helpful). I'm furious about a lot, including how little the Canadian government is doing, diplomatically and otherwise, to intervene in Syria, and so I spent last night in a righteous rage, calling and tweeting and pulling out my credit card. It turns out that I'm pretty okay with being angry when the alternative is feeling impotent and helpless

What does all of this have to do with the holidays, you might ask? I love a good plan--see, as evidence, the fact that I never go anywhere without my Hobonichi Techo planner, or my way over-the-top first week post-PhD schedule--and while I'm planning for the holidays, I'm also going to use my holidays for planning. I've got a long list of things I want to do, for fun and self-care. I want to finish reading all of the Miss Fisher novels. I want to work on my novel every day. I want to go shopping in Kensington Market and cook an amazing anniversary dinner with my partner. I want to finally figure out what the hell to do with that stupid corner cabinet in the kitchen. I want to finish crocheting the giant blanket I've been working on. I want to go to the movies. I want to take my godson on his first trip to the art gallery. I want to spend time feeding and hugging and listening to my people. I want to sit in front of the fire.

But I also want to use my holidays to do some research and learning and planning toward a more sustainable approach to anger and advocacy next year. I'm pretty sure--Rebecca Solnit's hope for a miracle aside--that 2017 is going to be a crappy, crappy year. It's going to be full of all of that fear and rage and sadness that I'm working hard to get good at. And I need to figure out the most useful and sensible ways to channel those feelings into sustainable, mindful, planned action. And so I'm going spend part of my holidays planning for 2017. What local organizations can I get involved or more involved in that support the work of intersectional feminist joy-killing, combatting climate change, helping refugees? What organizations, local and international, most deserve my money and do the most impactful work with donations? What and who should I add to my reading list to help me be a better advocate and ally? What's the contact information for the most powerful and responsive people in local, provincial, and federal governments? How can I better connect and collaborate with the amazing people in my life who share my concerns and goals? What does sustainable activism--a steady blaze, not a flash fire--look like for me, in good balance with work, research, creative, and family life?

Obviously, I'm not going to be able to do all of things I want to over the holidays, but in planning for both self-care and activism, I'm hoping to head into 2017 feeling recharged and ready to keep working and fighting. This is likely our last post of 2016 on Hook & Eye, and so from all of us, wishing you a restful and rage-filled winter break. Let's burn down the worst parts of the world and make s'mores while we're at it.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Drop us a line! We're angling for vigorous commentary, but we will cut loose any vitriol dragged up from the depths.